Sol Lewitt

 

Sol Lewitt Case Study

Sol Lewitt's Wall Drawing #260 consists of a set of squares that hold all two-part combinations of white arcs from corners and sides, and white straight, non-straight, and broken lines. Following his instructions, squares within the set are chosen and placed in random orientations to fill a grid at the desired scale creating one combination out of an infinte number of possible results. To further the case study, the original result and its transformation are lofted to suggest infinite three-dimensional possibilities.

 
 
 
Sol Lewitt,  Wall Drawing #136: Arcs and Lines , 1972, Dia Beacon 

Sol Lewitt, Wall Drawing #136: Arcs and Lines, 1972, Dia Beacon 

 
 
 

Wall drawings arise from sets of diagrams and instructions for installation and are drawn directly on the wall using graphite, crayon, colored pencil, paint, and other materials. Although usually carried out by artists or trained assistants, theoretically, anyone can apply these wall drawings using his specified geometries. Lewitt’s guidelines are disciplined, but not strict regarding the final product, allowing the installer to make choices within the rules that vary the end result. Thus, wall drawings are defined by a system and process of creation.

 

Sol Lewitt, Wall Drawing #260, 1975MoMA 

 

2D Process

 

glossary of units: all two-part combinations of white arcs from corners and sides, and white straight, non-straight, and broken lines

 
 
 

iterative process

 
 
 

result in 2D

 
 

3D Process

extrusion between two drawings using 3D grids

 
 
 

result in 3D, possible applications include partition, facade, and shading design

 
 
 
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